Frequently asked questions


When do I have to enrol by?

You must be on the roll for your main living address within Victoria before 8.00 pm on Tuesday 6 November (Melbourne Cup Day).

Who has to enrol?

Enrolment is compulsory if you are an Australian citizen, aged 18 years or over, and you have lived at your current address (in Victoria) for at least one month.

Can I enrol before I turn 18?

If you are 17 years old, you can provisionally enrol (external link) before the roll closes. This means that if you turn 18 on, or before election day, you will automatically be included on the State election roll and can vote.

I won't have lived at my current address for a month by the close of roll. What do I do about my enrolment?

You need to have lived at your new address for one month before updating your enrolment details. So you will need to vote for your old address for this election.

I have moved interstate, what do I do about my Victorian enrolment?

If you have lived at your interstate address for at least one month, you should update your enrolment before 8.00 pm on Tuesday 6 November. Otherwise you may receive a notice after the election asking why you did not vote.

If your enrolment update is not processed before 8.00 pm on Tuesday 6 November, you will receive a notice following the election asking why you have not voted. If you receive a notice, you should respond advising that you were living interstate at the time of the election.

I have no permanent home. How do I enrol?

You can apply to be a ‘no fixed address’ elector up to 8.00 pm on Tuesday 6 November, which is the last day for enrolling for this election.

Download a No fixed address enrolment form (external link).

I will be interstate or overseas and won’t be back before election day. What can I do?

If you will be interstate or overseas during the voting period, you can vote at an interstate or overseas early voting centre.

Check locations using our Voting Centre Locator

You can also vote by post. Find out how to apply for a postal vote

You can also let us know you will be interstate or overseas using our Traveller Notification form

How can I vote if I am going overseas for a long period (e.g. 6 months or more)?

If you are leaving on or after Monday 12 November, but before election day, you can vote before you go. Find early voting centres

If you are going overseas for up to six years you can complete an Overseas Notification form. You can nominate to have your details removed from the roll and be excused from voting or to remain on the roll. You can also complete a General Postal Voter form (external link) to have your ballot papers mailed to you if you would still like to vote in future elections.

If you nominate to remain on the roll you will be able to vote at Federal, State and local government elections while you are away, and will not be fined if you do not vote.

Do I have to vote?

Voting is compulsory if you are on the electoral roll at the close of roll. If you don't vote you will receive a letter in February 2019 asking for an explanation. You must respond and provide your reason for failing to vote.

If you have a valid reason for failing to vote, you may be excused. If you don't have a valid reason, you may be fined.

Where can I vote?

You can vote at any voting centre in Victoria, or at interstate or overseas locations.

Find your nearest voting centre using our Voting Centre locator.

From early November, every household will receive an Election Guide, which will list all voting centres in your area.

I don’t like any of the candidates and parties. Do I have to vote?

Under Victorian electoral law, voting is compulsory. Not liking the candidates or parties is not a valid excuse for failing to vote. If you do not vote you may be fined.

I don’t agree with compulsory voting. Why is it compulsory?

Under Victorian electoral law, voting is compulsory.

If you want to pursue this issue, you may wish to write to your local MP once results are known. You can locate your local member on the Victorian Parliament website (external link).

I am 70 years old or over. Do I have to vote?

All enrolled electors must vote in an election regardless of age.

If you are 70 or older, you can apply to become a general postal voter. By doing so, you will automatically have your ballot papers mailed to you for State and council attendance elections.

Complete a General Postal Vote Application Form (external link)

The application to become a GPV needs to be processed before 8.00 pm on Tuesday 6 November.

I can’t vote without assistance. Can I vote by phone or electronically?

If you are unable to vote without assistance because you are blind, have low vision or have a motor impairment, you will be able to register for Telephone Assisted Voting at this State election. The registration process opens on Monday 12 November and the number to call is 1300 498 791 from that date onwards.

Other forms of electronic voting will not be available at this State election.

What is the fine for not voting?

The fine for failing to vote is currently $81.

I have a relative who is incapable of voting because of severe dementia or illness. Can you take them off the roll?

An elector may only be removed from the roll if a registered medical practitioner has certified in writing that the person is incapable of understanding the nature and significance of enrolment and voting.

Download and complete an Elector no longer capable form (external link).

I am too ill to vote and can’t leave my home. How can I vote?

You may qualify to register as a general postal voter (external link) or you can apply for a postal vote online.

Ballot papers will be dispatched from Monday 12 November - once candidates have nominated.

I cannot get to a voting centre because I am caring for someone who is seriously ill. What can I do?

You can apply to register as a general postal voter (external link) or you can apply for a postal vote online.

Ballot papers will be dispatched from Monday 12 November - once candidates have nominated.

My relative is a prisoner. Can they vote?

Prisoners serving a sentence of less than five years are eligible to vote at the State election.

A supply of postal vote applications has been sent to prisons in Victoria, so if your relative is enrolled, they can apply to vote by post.

Mobile voting teams will visit some prisons. You will need to contact the prison directly for this information.

Will mobile voting teams be visiting hospitals and other facilities?

The VEC provides mobile voting services to hospitals, nursing homes, aged care facilities, prisons, homeless support agencies and centres for people who are blind or have low vision.

If you are not sure if your family member’s facility is registered for mobile voting, please check with the facility directly.

If your relative is unable to vote when the team attends ask the election official to make a record of this.