1955-present: stability

The 50s ushered in almost three decades of government by one party, and Victoria’s longest-serving premier. The age to vote and stand as a candidate was lowered to 18, and in the 90s, Victoria got its first female premier. 

1955 

28 May – Henry Bolte (Liberal and Country) elected. This election ushered in 27 years of Liberal governments in Victoria.

Bolte became the longest-serving premier, re-elected in 1958, 1961, 1964, 1967 and 1970. Bolte retired in 1972 and was replaced by Rupert Hamer.

1970

First women elected to the Upper House.

1973 

18 May – Age to qualify to vote and stand as candidate lowered to 18.

Rupert Hamer (Liberal) elected.

Re-elected in 1976 and 1979. Hamer resigned in 1981 and was replaced by Lindsay Thompson.

1982 

3 April – John Cain junior (Labor) elected.  Joan Kirner becomes the first female Victorian Cabinet Minister.

Re-elected in 1985 and 1988.

1984

Lower House terms increased to maximum of four years, with a minimum of three.

17-year olds allowed to enrol provisionally.

1990

John Cain resigns and Joan Kirner becomes Victoria’s first female Premier.

1992

3 October – Jeff Kennett (Liberal-National Coalition) elected.

Re-elected in 1996.

1999

18 September – Steve Bracks (Labor) minority government elected. 

Re-elected in 2002 and 2006. Resigned in 2007 and was replaced by John Brumby.

2002

Electoral Act modernises administration of elections. 

2006

First election with fixed four-year terms.

Proportional representation voting introduced for the Upper House.

2010

27 November – Ted Baillieu (Liberal-National Coalition) elected.

Replaced in 2013 by Denis Napthine.

 

2014

29 November – Daniel Andrews (Labor) elected.

Re-elected 2018.

2017

Lidia Thorpe becomes Victoria’s first Aboriginal Member of Parliament.

2018

Political donation disclosure laws come into effect.