Special enrolment circumstances

Being correctly enrolled is a key part of the democratic process. For people with specific needs or circumstances that make enrolling or updating their enrolment difficult, there are several special enrolment options available.

What if I can't get to a voting centre?

If you can't get to a voting centre you can register as a General Postal Voter and always vote via post. You are automatically sent a ballot pack for every election and must complete and return it before election day.

Our Postal voting page provides further details and you can enrol using the General Postal Voter registration form (PDF, 1.0MB).

What if I'm travelling or living overseas?

You do not need to take action if you're travelling but still consider your main residence to be in Victoria.

There are various options available if there is an election while you are travelling and you want to vote.

If you have moved interstate, you will be automatically removed from the electoral roll in Victoria when you enrol at your new address.

If you are living overseas indefinitely or permanently you can notify the VEC that you do not wish to vote by supplying an Overseas notification form (PDF, 150kB)

What if I don't want my address appearing on the roll for safety reasons?

If you believe that by having your address printed on the electoral roll your personal safety, or your family's safety, could be at risk you can Enrol as a silent elector (PDF, 1.0MB).

As a silent elector your address will not be shown on future editions of the electoral roll. You are still required to vote in all applicable elections. You must keep your details up-to-date by filling in a standard enrolment form if your circumstances change and you will need to complete a new silent elector form each time you change your address.

Being granted silent elector status is not automatic. The decision is made by the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC). More information can be found at Australian Electoral Commission - silent electors (external link) or by calling the AEC on 13 23 26.

What if I'm experiencing homelessness?

If you are experiencing homelessness or don't have access to safe and secure housing you can enrol as an elector using a No fixed address enrolment form (PDF, 510kB).

For more information on please visit our Being homeless doesn't make you vote-less page.

The VEC also runs a community program called Homeless not Voteless which provides training to homelessness workers and helps people experiencing homelessness to enrol and vote.

What if I'm working at a station in Antarctica?

You can enrol as an Antarctic elector for the period you are working at a station there. This category of enrolment is managed by the Australian Electoral Commission (external link).

Can I enrol when I'm 17 years old?

If you are 17 years old, you can enrol provisionally. You will then automatically be enrolled when you turn 18. You will be entitled to vote if you are 18 on election day, even if you turned 18 after the close of rolls for that election.

To enrol provisionally, you simply fill out:

What about people with a cognitive disability/impairment?

The VEC has produced an information brochure with enrolment and voting advice for families and carers of people with a cognitive disability/impairment:

What if I am unable to sign my name?

An enrolment form for people who are unable to sign (PDF, 538kB) their name due to physical incapacity is available. This allows another enrolled voter to sign on your behalf and also includes a medical certificate.

What if I am serving a prison sentence in Victoria?

If you're serving a prison sentence in Victoria, and your sentence is under 5 years, you are still entitled to enrol and vote in State and local council elections.

For more information please see our brochure about enrolment and voting for prisoners:

Can I enrol just for local council elections?

If you are enrolled to vote, then you must vote in all Federal, State and local council elections, statutory elections and polls.

You may also be eligible to vote in local council elections if:

  • you own and pay council rates on a property in a different municipality from the one you live in or
  • you are not an Australian citizen but you own and pay rates on a property.

There are different voting entitlements for local council elections. Please see Enrolling for local council elections for more information.

What if I'm not on the roll?

If you're eligible to be on the electoral roll but you haven't enrolled or updated your enrolment, you may be fined.

From 1 July 2015 the penalty amount is $152.00 and this figure will be indexed at the beginning of every financial year.

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